Buying a used car from a private seller may pose a slightly higher risk than you would face.

Buying a used car from a private seller may pose a slightly higher risk than you would face when buying from a car dealer. Private sellers may have outstanding loans on the car that could account for an inability to produce an original title. Worse, your seemingly trustworthy seller might be trying to pawn a “hot” car off on you. The potential for problems may seem endless, but you shouldn’t let this discourage you. After all, some of the best deals are made through private seller purchases. Just exercise enough caution and you should be fine. One of the major downsides to buying from a private seller is that you will have no protection—private sellers don’t provide warranties like dealers do. If the car breaks down the day after you close on the purchase, you’ll simply have to deal with it. When you check out a car, make sure you do it in broad daylight. This way, you’ll be able to detect any flaws that can point to bigger problems. Since private sellers may be at work during the day, arrange to see the car on a weekend rather than at day’s end. Also, ask intelligent questions, including how many owners that car has previously had; how long the seller has had the car for (if the seller’s had it for a month or less, it could be stolen); and check all available maintenance records. ofio.pl

Lascia un commento

Questo sito usa Akismet per ridurre lo spam. Scopri come i tuoi dati vengono elaborati.